The 17 Orthodox Christian Monasteries of Fr. Ephraim of Arizona in USA & Canada

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Elder Ephraim’s Orthodox Monasteries in North America

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π. Εφραίμ ο Αριζονίτης – Fr. Ephraim of Arizona

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Photos from St Anthony’s Greek Orthodox Monastery, Arizona, USA

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The Spiritual War – Father Efraim of Philotheou and Arizona

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Facebook about Father Ephraim Philotheitis, Arizona, USA 

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 http://www.stanthonysmonastery.org/index.php

St Anthony’s Monastery in Arizona

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The Monasteries of Fr. Ephraim in North America

1. Holy Monastery of the Nativity of the Theotokos
Abbess Theophano
121 St. Elias Lane
Saxonburg, PA 16056 USA
Tel: (724) 352-3999
Fax: (724) 352-5822
2. Holy Monastery of St. Kosmas Aitolos
Abbess Alexia
14155 Caledon King Town
Line Rd. South
Bolton, Ont. L7E 5R7
CANADA
Tel: (905) 859-2474
Fax: (905) 859-2505
Web Site
3. Holy Monastery of Panagia Parigoritissa
Abbess Thekla
827 Chemin de la Carriere
Brownsburg (Chatham),
Quebec, J8G 1K7
CANADA
Tel: (450) 533-4313
Fax: (450) 533-1169
Web Site
4. Holy Monastery of St. John Chrysostomos
Abbess Melanie
4600 93rd Street
Pleasant Prairie, WI 53158 USA
Tel: (262) 694-9850
Fax: (262) 697-1581
Web Site
5. Holy Protection Monastery
Abbess Olympiada
1 St. Joseph’s Way
White Haven, PA 18661 USA
Tel: (570) 443-2220
Fax: (570) 443-9167
Web Site
6. Holy Monastery of the Theotokos, the Life-Giving Spring
Abbess Markella
P.O. Box 549
Dunlap, CA 93621 USA
Tel: (559) 338-3110
Fax: (559) 338-3101
7. Holy Monastery of St. John the Forerunner
Abbess Efpraxia
5 Timmer Lane
Goldendale, WA 98620 USA
Tel: (509)-773-7141
Fax: (509) 773-4131
Web Site
8. Holy Monastery of St. Anthony
Archimandrite Paisios
4784 N. St. Joseph’s Way
Florence, AZ 85132
Tel: 520-868-3188
Fax: 520-868-3088
Web Site
9. Holy Archangels’ Monastery
Archimandrite Dositheos
P.O. Box 422
Kendalia, TX 78027 USA
Tel: (830) 833-2793
Fax: (830) 833-2231
Web Site
10. Holy Monastery of Panagia Vlahernon
Monk Modestos
12600 West Hwy. 318
Williston, FL 32696
Tel: (352) 591-1716
Fax: (352) 591-1719
Web Site
11. Annunciation Monastery
Abbess Agapia
13486 N.W. Hwy. 225
Reddick, FL 32686 USA
Tel: (352) 591-1803
Fax: (352) 591-2083
Web Site
12. Holy Trinity Monastery
Hieromonk Joseph
125 Sturdevant Rd.
Smith Creek, MI 48061 USA
Tel: (810) 367-8134
Fax: (810) 367-6344
13. Holy Monastery of Panagia Prousiotissa
Abbess Agne
404 Warner Road
Troy, NC 27371 USA
Tel: (910) 572-3331
Fax: (910) 572-4176
Web Site
14. Panagia Pammakaristou
Hieromonk Nektarios
1631 Creasey Rd.
Lawsonville, NC 27032 USA
Tel: (336) 593-9760
Fax: (336) 593-9767
15. Holy Monastery of St. Nektarios
Hieromonk Joseph
100 Lake Anawanda Rd.
Roscoe, NY 12776 USA
Tel: (607) 498-5285
Fax: (607) 498-5468
Web Site
16. Holy Transfiguration Monastery
Abbot Akakios
17906 Rt. 173
Harvard, IL 60033 USA
Tel: (815) 943-3588
Fax: (815) 943-3878
Web Site
17. Holy Monastery of St. Paraskevi
Abbess Paraskevi
6855 Little York Lane
Washington, TX 77880 USA
Tel: (936) 878-2390
Fax: (936) 878-2630
Web Site

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Eastern Orthodox Christian Parishes near Montreal, Canada

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Orthodoxy in America

Eastern Orthodox Christian Parishes near Montreal, Canada

St. Nicholas Mission
1 miles
Detail Map 555 Guy #2
Montreal, QC, J3Z 2V5
514.846.3232

SS. Peter & Paul Sobor
2 miles
Detail Map 1175 rue Champlain
Montreal, QC, H2L 2R7
514.522.2801

St. Nicholas Cathedral
2 miles
Detail Map 422 St Joseph Blvd W
Outremont, PQ, H2V 2P5
514/276-8322
Email

Holy Trinity Church
2 miles
Detail Map 351 Mellville Ave.
Westmount, QC, H3Z 2J7
514.932.8529
Email

The Sign of the Theotokos Church
2 miles
Detail Map 750 St. Joseph Boulevard East
Montreal, QC, H2J 1K2
514.934.0539
Email
Website

St. Markella
2 miles
Detail Map 5390 St. Urbain Street
Montreal, QC, H2T 2X1
(514) 270-4513

The Hellenic Community of Montreal
3 miles
Detail Map 5777 Wilderton Avenue
Montreal, QC, H3S 2V7
(514) 738-2421

St. John the Baptist
3 miles
Detail Map 1841 Masson St
Montreal, QC, H2H lAl
514.527.3314
Website

St. Cyril & Methodius & St. Romanos the Melodist Chapel
3 miles
Detail Map 2875 Douglas Ave
Montreal, QC, H3R 2C7
514.738.4018

St. George Church
3 miles
Detail Map 555-575 Jean-Talon St E
Montr?al, QC, H2R 1T8
514.276.8533
Email

St. Nicholas Church
3 miles
Detail Map 80 de Castelnau St E
Montreal, QC, H2R 1P2
514.270.9788

St. John of Rila Church
4 miles
Detail Map c.p. 63610 co. Van Horn
Montreal, QC, H3W 3H8
514.624.2882
Email

Evangelismos – Virgin Mary Church
4 miles
Detail Map 777 St. Roch Street
Montreal, QC, H3N 2K3
(514) 273-9796

Koimisis – Virgin Mary Church
4 miles
Detail Map 7700 De L’Epee St. Park Ext.
Montreal, QC, H3N 2E6
(514) 273-9888

St. George
4 miles
Detail Map 2455 Cote St. Catherine Road
Montreal, QC, H3T 1A8
(514) 738-9360

Annunciation Church
4 miles
Detail Map 8080 Ave Christophe-Columb
Montreal, QC, H2R 2S9
514.486.6341
Email

St. Dionysios
5 miles
Detail Map 7707 LaSalle Boulevard
Ville LaSalle, QC, H8P 1Y5
(514) 364-5442

Holy Archangels Michael & Gabriel
5 miles
Detail Map 807 Av Sainte-Croix
Saint-Laurent, QC, H4L 3X6
514.824.4627
Email
Website

St. Marina
6 miles
Detail Map 5220 Grande Allee
St. Hubert, QC, J3Y 1A1
(514) 656-4832

Virgin Mary Church
6 miles
Detail Map 120 Gouin E
Montreal, QC, H3L 2L9
514.337.3927
Email

The Vikings in Newfoundland: Canada’s first Orthodox parish? – Fr. Geoffrey Korz

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The Vikings in Newfoundland: Canada’s first Orthodox parish?

by Fr. Geoffrey Korz

“Where two or three are gathered together in My name,

I am there in the midst of them” – Matthew 18:20

Source:

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com/2015/09/the-vikings-in-newfoundland-canadas-first-orthodox-parish/

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

The tiny community of L’Anse aux Meadows at the far northern tip of Newfoundland is distinguished among Canadian heritage sites as the oldest European settlement in Canada. Scarcely a dozen buildings remain of this Viking settlement, constructed over one thousand years ago by a group of Scandinavian settlers who appeared ready to make a new home in the frigid northlands of what would later become Canada.

It is almost certain that the tiny group was led by a Viking named Karlsefni, an associate of Leif Erikson (called Leif the Lucky, for his many extraordinary successes), one of the first Norsemen to accept baptism within a largely pagan culture. By the time these settlers arrived in Canada, Christianity and paganism were living side by side in northern Europe, and had not yet had the opportunity to discover the differences which would inevitably lead to conflict. The Norse were a pragmatic lot, whose religious zeal was usually focused on doing whatever it took to survive and to win. And the Christian God was the ultimate Victor.

A delightful story is told of the curious Viking habit of seeking repeat baptisms; it seems the Norsemen were drawn to baptism, every year, at the hands of Saint Ansgar and others, enjoying the fresh white shirt and ten silver talents they customarily received at the hands of the priest, if only they would allow themselves to be submerged beneath the sacred waters (Joseph Lynch, Christianizing Kinship, p. 73). For the average pragmatic Viking, multiple baptisms simply made sense: it conferred spiritual as well as material benefits desperately needed in a seagoing culture, where life was hard, brutish, and short.

It is understandable that Orthodox clergy in the Norse lands immediately curtailed the Viking zeal for multiple baptisms, just as soon as it came to their attention. (The throngs of Norsemen must have been a bit of a blur to the average missionary priest. One can only imagine the encounters and conversations between the eager Vikings and the bewildered clerics). But just as with mission work today, only God can plumb the depths of the heart of a Christian man, and perhaps the Vikings did have their fair share of zealous converts, offering silver crosses as illustrations to the Odin worshipers of the God Who destroyed Death Itself. For a Norseman, just as for us today, one cannot do better than that.

We know that the Norse seafaring parties who traveled to North America contained mixed crews of Thor-worshipers and Christians (Erikson himself started out as the former, and ended up, rather early in life, as the latter). We also know that one of the parties of settlers his adventures produced the first Canadian-born child of European extraction, a boy named Snorri, whose grandchildren included three bishops right around the time of the Great Schism (news of which traveled very slowly to Viking lands, in any case).

Perhaps here we have a glimpse of the first Christian community in Canada: a tiny one, to be sure, and not organized as far as the Church is concerned. Their firstborn child was almost certainly baptized, although probably back in the old country, once his parents joined their companions and fled from the North American natives who never seemed to take a liking to the Norse tendency to attack on sight. Outnumbered, far from home, and cold (yes, even Vikings get cold), it was perhaps inevitable that the first Orthodox settlement in Canada was not to last. It would seem the unfortunate trend of Orthodox Canadians looking back to the old country and not putting down roots in the west was established early on.

It is almost certain that no Orthodox priest was present at the first settlement at L’Anse aux Meadows. Yet archaeological digs further northwest on Baffin Island present an interesting possibility. A thirteenth-century Thule native site produced an intriguing relic: a tiny carved figure dressed in European clothing, with evidence of a cape over the shoulders, and a long cloth draped around the neck, hanging down to the feet – and marked with a cross. Robert McGhee, who specializes in Arctic archaeology at the Canadian Museum of Civilization, suggests this figure shows a crusader who served as a retainer for a viking captain. This is based on the theory that Christian clergy in northern Europe did not wear pectoral crosses until a much later period.

Yet we know both Saints Cuthbert and Adamnan, saints of the Orthodox west, both wore such crosses, as we can see today on display at the cathedral in Durham, in the north of England. It seems more difficult to believe that a crusader would have traveled thousands of miles with pagan Vikings, rather than a Christian priestmonk, seeking out mission territory, or more likely, seeking a remote monastic home, as we know the Celts did in Greenland centuries before. Whether this figure represented an Orthodox priest or a cleric of the western Latins after the Schism, we’ll likely never know.

But for Orthodox Christians in Canada, the rubble at L’Anse aux Meadows and the carving from Baffin Island remind us that a minute Orthodox presence likely existed in Canada long before two world wars, and long before the Reformation. These facts confirm that the first Christians to set foot on our soil were from what is sometimes erroneously called the “undivided Church” – the Orthodox Church before the breaking away of Rome. And our brother Leif the Lucky, along with his kinsmen at L’Anse aux Meadows – and perhaps even a lone priestmonk on Baffin island, were what one might think of as founding members of the first Orthodox community in Canada – whether they knew it, or not.

Archdiocese of Canada – Find a Parish

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Archdiocese of Canada

Source:

http://oca.org

http://oca.org/parishes/diocese/CA

OCA – ORTHODOX CHURCH IN AMERICA

St. George the Victorious Mission

Brantford, Ontario

Holy Apostles Mission Station

Chilliwack, British Columbia

Welcome

Hermitage of the Protection of the Theotokos

Edmonton, Alberta
Deanery: Alberta Deanery

Nativity of the Holy Virgin Church

Nativity of the Holy Virgin Church

Kysylew, Alberta
Deanery: Alberta Deanery

St. Sergius of Radonezh Chapel

St. Sergius of Radonezh Chapel

Lac Labelle, Quebec
Deanery: Quebec Deanery

Communaute Monastique de St. Seraphim de Sarov

Communaute Monastique de St. Seraphim de Sarov

Montreal, Quebec
Deanery: Quebec Deanery

St. Benoît de Nursie Church

St. Benoît de Nursie Church

Montréal, Quebec
Deanery: Quebec Deanery

St. Michael the Archangel Church

St. Michael the Archangel Church

Sachava, Alberta
Deanery: Alberta Deanery

St. Demetrius of Thessalonika Church

St. Demetrius of Thessalonika Church

Serediaky (Mundare), Alberta
Deanery: Alberta Deanery

Holy Dormition of Most Holy Theotokos Mission

Sherbrooke, Quebec

Hermitage of Prophet Elias

Hermitage of Prophet Elias

Smoky Lake County (Dickie Bush), Alberta
Deanery: Alberta Deanery

Hermitage of St. Anthony the Great

Westport, Ontario
Deanery: Ontario Deanery

Fr. Lawrence Farley, Canada: The Not So Eastern Church

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The Not So Eastern Church

by

Fr. Lawrence Farley, Canada

Source:

https://oca.org

https://oca.org/reflections/fr.-lawrence-farley/the-not-so-eastern-church

ORTHODOX CHURCH IN AMERICA

I can, I think, count on the fingers of my one hand the number of times I have described myself as an Eastern Orthodox. Usually the preferred self-designation is simply “Orthodox,” but sometimes this provokes confusion, as when I am further asked, “Oh, are you Jewish?” The respondent has clearly heard of Orthodox Jews, and supposes that I must be one of them, though you would think the big pectoral cross around my neck would tip them off somewhat that I was a Christian. On these occasions I am reduced to elaborating more fully, saying that I am an Eastern Orthodox Christian: “You know, like the Russians, or the Greeks?” The respondent’s eyes then glaze over for a moment, since I am neither Russian, nor Greek, but they usually let the matter drop. In these conversations, the adjective “eastern” serves to connect me with a known quantity, such as the Russian Orthodox Church or the Greek Orthodox Church—i.e. the ones on television with the fancy robes and the icons.

There is a reason for not referring to our Church as “the Eastern Orthodox Church”—namely, that we are not in fact eastern. Our own jurisdiction has its membership in the west (i.e. North America), and my own parish is situated on the extreme west coast of that western continent. So, in what sense are we eastern? Only in the historical sense, and long dead history at that. In the first millennium the Church was dispersed throughout the Roman world, living in the west from Britain to Rome and in the east, from Jerusalem to Parthia and beyond. (Yep, Parthia. Like I said: long dead history.) In those far off days, east was east and west was west and never (or rarely) the twain shall meet. The church organized itself into patriarchates, including the famous five of the so-called “Pentarchy”, even though the actual reality never was quite as tidy as all that. In this ancient system, you had Rome leading the west, and Constantinople leading the east. Latin flourished out west, and Greek out east (and later on, Slavic languages in the northern land of the Rus) and, oh yes, Syriac. In those days, the designations of “western church” and “eastern church” meant something, since the faithful who lived in the west didn’t often visit the east, and those in the east visited the west even less often. Most people, in fact, didn’t travel very far from their homes at all, and for the overwhelming majority a trip of a hundred miles was the trip of a lifetime. The Greeks stayed in Greece, and the British stayed in Britain. (The Irish monks took to travelling, but that counted as a kind of ascetic exploit, and was quite exceptional.) Thus “the eastern church” was the church you found in the eastern part of the Roman empire, and which had certain identifiable characteristics, including language, liturgical traditions, and a certain way of organizing its life. “The western church” was the one you found in the west, which also had its distinctive language (Latin), its liturgical traditions and ways of organizing itself. Geography largely determined where churches with these characteristics were to be found.

That was then, and this is now. Since then people have enjoyed a tremendous increase in mobility. Greeks no longer are to be found only in Greece; they can be found anywhere. And people formerly found only in the west are now found also in eastern regions. Thus, people of religions that were once found in geographical concentration in a particular place can now be found everywhere in the global village: Roman Catholicism is global—as is Orthodoxy. As is Islam.

In this world it makes little sense to refer to the Roman Catholic church (or to its Protestant daughters) as “the western church,” and little sense to refer to the Orthodox church as “the eastern church.” Geography has succumbed to mobility and world-wide diffusion. Could one perhaps salvage the designation “eastern” by using it to refer to the liturgical usages of the church that was once rooted and concentrated in the east? Could one say that things like the use of incense, and chanted services, and icons, and not using pews, are specifically and peculiarly eastern?

Well, no, actually. In the church of Britain before the Reformation, all of these things could be found there too. One entered a British church in (say) the fourteenth century and found Latin—and also icons all over the walls, and incense, and long chanted services, and no pews. It even had a large screen up front—the “rood screen” (not exactly an iconostas), separating the nave from the chancel. Things that we now most commonly associate with “the eastern Orthodox church” were once universal, even in the west. They are not so much specifically eastern as specifically Christian. The west has dropped most of them, and these things now survive only in the Orthodox Church.

I would suggest therefore that the issue is not whether a church is eastern, but whether its teaching is true. I sometimes meet dear friends who come from the “western churches” of Roman Catholicism and Protestantism, who tell me that they could never convert to Orthodoxy because it is “eastern” and they are “western.” Conversion is treated as a kind of betrayal of their ancestors. But surely this is to do a disservice to one’s ancestors, who would prefer that one choose the truth whether it accords with family pedigree or not. And what about people from non-Christian backgrounds? What about people from India or China? Their ancestors were Hindus and Buddhists or Taoists, yet no one sensibly suggests that conversion to the Christian Faith involves a disservice to them. The fact is that for all people of whatever ancestry or geography, conversion involves taking Abraham and the patriarchs as their new ancestors, and like them “leaving your country and your father’s house” (Genesis 12:1). To be a Christian at all involves becoming a stranger to all the tribes of earth, and living as an alien and sojourner here, and of confessing that here we have continuing city (1 Peter 2:11, Hebrews 13:14). It is folly to say that we will embrace this eschatological rootlessness, but only if we can still retain cultural vestiges that defined our ancestors.

The Orthodox Church is not “the eastern Church.” It is simply “the Church”—the one that began in the east (i.e. Jerusalem) and from there spread out into all the world. Schisms and other catastrophes have attended it over the years as it soldiered on throughout the long and winding course of history. But it remains now what it always was. One can perhaps find our church defined as “the eastern church” in Google. But one cannot find it so described in the Creed. There we find it described with greater accuracy: “the one, holy, catholic, and apostolic Church”. Not so eastern, is it?

Holy Icon of All Saints of Canada & USA

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Orthodox Saints of Canada & USA

Answering Main Street Canada

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COMING HOME – ORTHODOXY

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Fr-Korz

Answering Main Street Canada

Source:

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com

http://journeytoorthodoxy.com/2013/05/answering-main-street-canada/

JOURNEY TO ORTHODOXY

We offer you an article written by Fr. Geoffrey Korz, Managing Editor of Orthodox Canada and the Dean of All Saints of North America Orthodox Church in Hamilton ON, Canada.

Some years ago, I had the pleasure of dining in Toronto’s “Greek Town” with a sister in Christ, a Greek grandmother who had been around the Church all her life, and who was a true realist. As we walked through the warm summer streets, surrounded by mobs of young people – many of them Greek, and presumably Orthodox Christians – my friend let out an audible exclamation.

“Look at them, Father – they don’t even know what an Orthodox priest is! Why aren’t they at Church?! They should be ashamed of themselves!”

Of course hearing this, all these young people heard the voice of their own yia-yia, or grandmother, confronting them with their own lack of piety, spiritual observance, and Continue reading “Answering Main Street Canada”